Home of the Kentucky Derby, Churchill Downs’ iconic twin spires tower over Louisville, a castle looming down on the peeling shotgun houses huddled at its base. Ladies teeter by boarded-up bungalows on Prada stilettos, avoiding wide cracks in the sidewalks and hanging on to immense flower- and feather-filled hats. Meanwhile, a man named Clarence rockets down the road hollering at every passing car. Tiptoeing expertly along the yellow line, narrowly avoiding collision with speeding traffic, he flashes his gold teeth at drivers and points wildly to his right. It’s only Thursday, two days from the Kentucky Derby, and the Louisville parking hustle is already in full swing. As thousands of race fans pour into the city, many locals fill their garages, driveways and lawns with tourists’ cars, charging $10 to $60 per vehicle, depending on their proximity to the track. People living close to the track can make upwards of $300 per day. Those living a little farther out often end up with nothing, although many try their luck.

"I don't do much these days - I'm disabled. Praying I'll make some money today but if God wants me to have money He will get it to me."
“I don’t do much these days – I’m disabled. Praying I’ll make some money today but if God wants me to have money, he will get it to me.” – Nick Pitney
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A few blocks from Churchill Downs, a child tries to convince passing drivers to park.
“Everybody calls me Junior. My family’s from Louisville and they always been real real poor. When I was fourteen I started selling balloons and candy at the circus – I made more money than my daddy did. I don’t think he ever forgave me for that.”
Rick Simpson. "My grandson Josh here is making more money on parking than me. That's why he's out here 'cause he's cute."
“My grandson Josh here is making more money on parking than me. That’s why he’s out here, ’cause he’s cute.” – Rick Simpson.
Gail Brumlevey. "I work at the racetrack now but I used to be a model, can't you tell?"
“I work at the racetrack now but I used to be a model, can’t you tell?” -Gail Brumlevey, who sells parking and also works as a “hotwalker,” walking the horses in circles around the barns to cool them down after exercise.
Rosalind Robinson and her granddaughter Amarriah Neal. "My husband and I are retired. We live on his disability - we alright. My backyard is filled up with cars. We making good money today. I ain't lived here long only eight months - I just love it here, look at all these fancy pretty people with their high heels and big hats, I just love watching them go by."
“My husband and I are retired. We live on his disability – we alright. My backyard is filled up with cars. We making good money today. I ain’t lived here long, only eight months. I just love it here; look at all these fancy pretty people with their high heels and big hats. I just love watching them go by.” – Rosalind Robinson with her granddaughter Amarriah Neal.
Don Lee Spencer Jr. helps his mom sells parking spots outside Churchill Downs.
Angela Withers. "I ain't worked for years, unless you count the four kids I'm raising. I made $330 on parking last year. Ain't made a dime today though."
“I ain’t worked for years, unless you count the four kids I’m raising. I made $330 on parking last year. Ain’t made a dime today though.” – Angela Withers
Donna Sudlett. "I'm a single mom, trying to raise up my three kids. I just stand here and hold this sign all day. They pay me $9 an hour but my feet hurt real bad and I'm so tired. I can almost just lay my head down here on this sign and go to sleep."
“I’m a single mom, trying to raise up my three kids. I just stand here and hold this sign all day. They pay me $9 an hour but my feet hurt real bad and I’m so tired. I can almost just lay my head down here on this sign and go to sleep.” – Donna Sudlett, who this year held a sign for the Council of Carpenters, which is protesting labor standards for construction work performed on the racetrack’s new additions.
"I'm just waiting for my disability to come in. I'm a full-time grandma, I'm trying to help my kids. My youngest daughter is sixteen and she's got a two-year-old." - Jennifer Pipes, selling parking outsider her home.
“I’m just waiting for my disability to come in. I’m a full-time grandma, I’m trying to help my kids. My youngest daughter is sixteen and she’s got a two-year-old.” – Jennifer Pipes, selling parking outside her home.
Charles Carter - Racetrack groom. "We ain't got no Derby horses, we just trying to get by."
“We ain’t got no Derby horses, we just trying to get by.” – Charles Carter, a “racetrack groom” who cares for horses at the track. Grooms are employed by a trainer to feed, water, clean, bandage and bathe the horses. His workday starts at four am; he said he probably would try to make a few extra bucks later in the afternoon selling parking spots.
“I ain’t made no money so far today.” – Dana Kinser

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Lili Holzer-Glier is a photographer based in Brooklyn, New York. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Vogue and The New York Times. Her first book, Rockabye, documents the Rockaways post–Hurricane Sandy and was published in 2015 by Daylight Books.